Classroom Accommodations - CHADD (2022)

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(Video) Time Management Interventions and Accommodations for People with ADHD

Classroom Management

Good classroom managers have efficient classrooms that meet the educational and psychological needs of their students. Classrooms are structured so that rules and routines are well known by the students and consistently followed. Transitions among lessons and activities are smooth. The teacher is able to give the impression that the he or she is aware of all activities by students in the classroom.Teachers with good classroom management skills meet the educational and personality needs of their students, regardless of their students’ abilities and special needs. Student misbehavior especially misbehavior related to ADHD symptoms, can be prevented by careful attention to the following:

  • the physical environment of the classroom (including minimizing distracting classroom displays)
  • establishing and practicing with the students rules and procedures for routines and classroom tasks
  • organizing lesson plans and instruction in a way that minimizes interruptions
  • increasing teacher awareness in the classroom by letting students know you are aware of their actions at all times

Accommodations are intended to help students with ADHD learn the same information as other students. They are changes to the structures and/or the environment that provide support to help students access the curriculum. Accommodations work best when they are tailored for the individual needs of the student based on the severity and symptoms of their ADHD and any other co-occurring conditions. It is important to observe the student to see which accommodations are effective – and effectiveness of accommodations can change over time. Students can also be enlisted in figuring out what helps them the most. This will also ensure that the accommodations are seen as support instead of punishment. Teachers, parents, and students should partner together to address needs and supports.

TheDiagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fifth Editionlists two categories of symptoms of ADHD—inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive. Students may have only one type, or they may have both types of symptoms. The accommodations that are appropriate for each student depend on the symptoms and on how much they impact the student.

Social Skills

Besides creating academic challenges, ADHD also affects social skills. Student may have trouble controlling their emotions, and younger kids especially may have difficulty keeping their hands to themselves. They might not interpret social cues effectively. They could also struggle with conversational skills. These challenges often cause students with ADHD to have difficulty making and keeping friends.

As a teacher, you can help by providing a positive learning environment. You can also teach, show, and support appropriate behavior in the following ways:

  • Praise the student for good behavior more often than punishing for bad. Give encouragement and reassurance. Let the student hear they are succeeding. Frequent but brief feedback that lets the student know they are on the right track is often very effective.
  • Work with students to set up a private signal, either visually or verbally, to help them recognize when their behavior is bordering on inappropriate. When prompting behavior you want it to be a reminder rather than a reprimand.
  • Promote self-awareness. Ask students to describe the problem or issue they are having. Ask them why they think it is happening and how they can change their behavior.
  • Give opportunities for group or paired learning. The opportunities provide a structured setting for students to interact with classmates.
  • Provide opportunities for other students to see them in a positive light. You might ask the student to help you with a task or give him or her a leadership role in the classroom for a day―anything to help the student feel connected to the classroom and the school.
  • Provide feedback in one-on-one settings. Not only do you preserve self-esteem by providing feedback privately, but you also can help reinforce positive behavior and have the student practice having a conversation with you to improve social skills.
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Accommodating ADHD in the Classroom

ADHD: Inattentive Symptoms

Students with inattentive symptoms are easily distracted and have trouble focusing. Everything competes for their attention. They often struggle to follow through with instructions and have difficulty with organization.

(Video) How to Get School Accommodations

To help students with managing inattentive symptoms, the following accommodations can be effective:

  • Seating the student in an area with fewer distractions where he or she can focus on the lesson. For example, near the teacher’s desk, away from windows and the doorway, or in another area that has few distractions.
  • Seating the student next to positive role models, peers who are less likely to provide distractions and can help them stay on task.
  • Breaking long assignments into smaller parts. This allows students to see both the start and end of the task.
  • Making sure all assignments are clear and provided in writing in addition to giving them out loud.
  • Checking with the student before they complete an assignment to see if they heard and understood instructions. Ask them to repeat it back to verify understanding.
  • Allowing them to take tests in a different room, one that is quiet and has few distractions. Or using aids such as headphones or privacy boards to create quiet spaces in the classroom.
  • Giving more time to complete assignments, projects, and tests.
  • Using a timer or alarm to help with time management.
  • Providing breaks. Depending on the student, these could include stretching, walking to the board to complete a task, or handing out assignments or materials.
  • Limiting repetitive assignments, particularly those the students has already mastered, or tasks that are too far above the student’s level. Students are most able to pay attention to tasks that present some challenge but are within their current learning zone.
  • Making sure that the student has the opportunity for physical activities because active movement increases the ability to focus. Recess should never be taken away as a punishment for misbehavior.
  • Providing tools to help with organization, such as different colored folders, a notebook with dividers, or a homework assignment book.
  • Using computers or tablets for work. Computers are visually stimulating and allow for more engagement and also help students organize their thoughts.

ADHD: Hyperactive-Impulsive Symptoms

Students with hyperactive-impulsive symptoms move a lot. They fidget, squirm, and have difficulty staying seated. They often talk excessively, blurt out answers, and have trouble taking turns.

To help students manage their hyperactive-impulsive symptoms, the following accommodations can be effective:

  • Seating the student in an area of the room where there will be the least disruption. This might be towards either side of the classroom rather than the center.
  • Allowing for the student to move around. You could allow the student to do their work while standing, sitting on the floor, or moving between desks.
  • Pairing the student with a peer who is a good role model and can model appropriate behavior.
  • Providing activity breaks. Depending on the student, these could include stretching, walking to the board to complete a task, or handing out assignments or materials.
  • Ignoring minor misbehavior.
  • Allowing the student to move or fidget in a non-distracting manner. They might tap their foot in the air or rotate their pen back and forth in their hands. Asking the student to offer suggestions is always a great way to get more ideas.
  • Allowing them to take tests in a different room. One that is quiet, has few distractions, and lets them move around without interrupting other students.
  • Praising when they exhibit appropriate behavior such as raising their hands and waiting to be called.
  • Limiting repetitive assignments, particularly those the students has already mastered, or tasks that are too far above the student’s level. Fidgeting is often a symptom of boredom or overstimulation.
  • Making sure that the student has the opportunity for physical activities. Recess should never be taken away as a punishment for misbehavior.
  • Using a speaking stick or other object that gets passed around during class discussions as a cue to indicate whose turn it is to speak.

ADHD: combined symptoms

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Many students with ADHD show a combination of inattention and hyperactive-impulsive behaviors. You can use a combination of accommodations from both lists. One of the best ways to identify which accommodations might work best is to observe the student’s natural behavior.

Some sample behaviors and accommodations include:

Sample BehaviorsAccommodations
Constantly moving in their seatTry giving them options for how they can do their work and provide breaks.
Attention wavers, but when focused blurts out answersTry consistent praise for raising their hands and seating them in an area with minimal distractions.
Has trouble completing assignments and tests in the allotted time because of distractionsTry an alternative test setting or breaking up assignments and tests into smaller sections. Allow extra time to complete tests.
Taps a pen constantly that is distracting to other studentsLet the student know privately that tapping their pen is a distraction. Ask them if they have other suggestion for how they could focus. You might offer that they could wave their pen in the air, wiggle it between their fingers, or replace the pen with a soft object to tap that won’t make noise.

References

Barkley, R. (2008). Classroom Accommodations for Children with ADHD. ADHD Report.

Dendy, C., Durheim, M., & Ellison, A. (2006).CHADD Educator’s Manual. Lynchburg, VA: Progress Printing.

(Video) National Resource Center on ADHD at CHADD

Parker, H. (2012). Accommodations Help Students with Attention Deficit Disorders. A.D.D. WareHouse.

Zentall, S. (2006).ADHD and Education Foundations, Characteristics, Methods, and Collaboration. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Chaban, P., McAuley, T., & Tannock, R. (2009). ADHD and Social-Emotional Abilities. www.AboutKidsHealth.ca.

FAQs

How students with ADHD are accommodated inside the classroom? ›

Allowing them to take tests in a different room, one that is quiet and has few distractions. Or using aids such as headphones or privacy boards to create quiet spaces in the classroom. Giving more time to complete assignments, projects, and tests. Using a timer or alarm to help with time management.

What are common ADHD accommodations? ›

Schedule frequent short quizzes, rather than one long test at the end of each unit. Give credit for work done instead of taking away points for late or partial assignments (with a plan for moving toward completing assignments). Grade for content, not for neatness. Give extra time and quieter space for work and tests.

What are the most common accommodations for students? ›

Common accommodations
  • Listen to audio recordings instead of reading text.
  • Learn content from audiobooks, movies, videos, and digital media instead of reading print versions.
  • Work with fewer items per page or line.
  • Work with text in a larger print size.

What are typical 504 accommodations for ADHD? ›

Help for Half-Done or Incomplete Assignments

Break long assignments into smaller segments, each with a deadline. Shorten assignments or work periods. Pair written instructions with oral instructions. Set a timer for 10-minute intervals and have the student get up and show the teacher her work.

What are 504 accommodations for ADHD? ›

What Accommodations Can Be In a 504 Plan or an IEP?
  • Seat the student close to the teacher or to a good role model.
  • Allow the student to share notes with a buddy.
  • Daily report cards or progress reports tracking behavior.
  • Extra time for tests or homework assignments.
  • Frequent breaks between assignments or tasks.
1 Aug 2022

What is the best learning environment for a child with ADHD? ›

Children with ADHD do much better using a hands-on approach to learning, Collins says. To ask a child with ADHD to sit and listen for hours will probably not work. So instead, look for a school in which kids are actively engaged in learning by experience.

What are examples of accommodations? ›

Examples of accommodations include:
  • sign language interpreters for students who are deaf;
  • computer text-to-speech computer-based systems for students with visual impairments or Dyslexia;
  • extended time for students with fine motor limitations, visual impairments, or learning disabilities;
24 May 2022

What does ADHD look like in the classroom? ›

A child who can't seem to sit still, who blurts out answers in class without raising his hand, who doesn't finish his homework, who seems to be daydreaming when the teacher gives instructions—these are well-known symptoms of ADHD.

What are the 4 accommodation categories? ›

Accommodations are typically grouped into four categories: presentation, response, setting, and timing and scheduling.

What are some examples of IEP accommodations? ›

Common examples of accommodations include extended time to complete assignments, provision of notes or outlines, untimed tests, and reduced number of test questions.

Why do people with ADHD need accommodations? ›

Student accommodations are designed to support students with learning challenges so they can achieve their academic potential. Accommodations help ADHD students both in how they acquire information, for example, in class, and how they demonstrate their knowledge in exam situations.

Is ADHD a 504 or an IEP? ›

Children with ADHD often receive services under Section 504 because the requirements for IDEA are more stringent. ADHD falls into the classification of Other Health Impaired (OHI).

Is there a downside to having a 504 plan? ›

Bad Things About 504 Plans

Students have to get labelled with a disability to get at 504 Plan. Some families want to keep disabilities private or disagree their child has a disability. 504 Plans open the door to school disability assessments, which may contain data a parent disagrees with.

What is a Type 1 accommodation? ›

Type 1 Accommodations: This type of accommodation is available for students who have a specific need and who routinely, independently, and effectively use the accommodation during classroom instruction and testing. It is not necessary to submit an Accommodation Request Form to TEA.

Can a school suspend a child with ADHD? ›

A child affected by ADHD alone or with co-occurring conditions (learning difficulties, anxiety, depression, autism spectrum) is more likely to be suspended from school than a child without those conditions, causing higher levels of psychological distress at least three years or more after the suspension.

Does a 504 plan cover behavior? ›

IDEA provides special protection for students who are on an IEP or 504 plan. The child's behavior is not excused, but the school does have an obligation to find a way of reducing the behavior. The school is unable to discipline a child for misbehavior that is a manifestation of their disability.

Is ADHD a disability for IEP? ›

Children with disabilities -- including ADHD, autism, and physical disabilities -- can get an IEP if there's evidence the condition affects their ability to succeed in school.

Which curriculum is best for ADHD? ›

  • Finding your child's learning style is one of the keys to success in any homeschool. ...
  • Singapore Math.
  • Easy Grammar.
  • WriteShop Junior E.
  • Verbal Math.
  • Usborne History Books.
  • Young Scientist's Club.
  • Anything from Critical Thinking Company.

Is homeschooling better for ADHD? ›

Homeschooling offers great benefits and flexibility that are perfect for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Providing your child with ADHD an education that can be catered to their needs helps them gain confidence and perform better academically.

Are Montessori schools better for ADHD? ›

The Montessori Environment Purposely Minimizes Distractions

For children with ADHD, a classroom that's full of bright colors and busy artwork can be an assault on the senses. Many children with ADHD process sensory input differently and environmental factors affect them strongly.

What are the most common accommodations for students with learning disabilities? ›

Examination Accommodations
  • extended exam time, typically time and one half to double time.
  • to take exams in a room with reduced distractions.
  • the assistance of a reader, scribe, or word processor for exams.
  • the option of an oral exam.
  • to use spelling and grammar assistive devices for essay exams.

What are examples of modifications in the classroom? ›

Usually a modification means a change in what is being taught to or expected from the student. Making an assignment easier so the student is not doing the same level of work as other students is an example of a modification. An accommodation is a change that helps a student overcome or work around the disability.

How do you differentiate a student with ADHD? ›

Delivery of Information – ADHD Students Learn Differently
  1. Give instructions one at a time. If possible, repeat.
  2. Work on the most difficult task early in the day.
  3. Use visual aids such as charts, pictures, and color coding.
  4. Create outlines to make note-taking easy for them. Organize as you teach.

How do students with ADHD learn best? ›

Create worksheets and tests with fewer items, give frequent short quizzes rather than long tests, and reduce the number of timed tests. Test students with ADHD in the way they do best, such as orally or filling in blanks. Divide long-term projects into segments and assign a completion goal for each segment.

What are six strategies teachers could use to teach a child with ADHD and help them be successful? ›

“My ADHD Teaching Strategies That Benefit All Students.”
  • Focus on short-term goals. When teaching children with ADHD, keep in mind that long-term goals are often overwhelming. ...
  • Rewards work. ...
  • Play music. ...
  • Teach students about the brain. ...
  • Allow them time to calm down. ...
  • Include mindfulness activities.

How do you help a child with ADHD sit still? ›

Another teacher let students use exercise balls instead of chairs so ADHD students could move around a bit, but still stay seated. —Provide fidget objects. These object can include worry beads, Wikki Stix, and squeeze balls — anything that can be quietly squished or handled.

What is the best learning environment for a child with ADHD? ›

Children with ADHD do much better using a hands-on approach to learning, Collins says. To ask a child with ADHD to sit and listen for hours will probably not work. So instead, look for a school in which kids are actively engaged in learning by experience.

What are examples of IEP accommodations? ›

Common examples of accommodations include extended time to complete assignments, provision of notes or outlines, untimed tests, and reduced number of test questions.

Which of the following is a recommended assessment accommodation for students with ADD ADHD? ›

A recommended assessment accommodation for students with ADHD is: Provide them with a shortened test. Allow them to take the test as an open-book test. Allow the student to take extra breaks.

How do you modify students with ADHD? ›

Below are some of the most effective strategies and adjustments you should make.
  1. Build a Strong Relationship with the Child's Parents. ...
  2. Educate Fellow Pupils. ...
  3. Establish Effective Seating Arrangements. ...
  4. Establish Rules and Routines. ...
  5. Be Simple, Clear, and Direct. ...
  6. Break Things Up. ...
  7. Allow Extensions. ...
  8. Reward Good Behaviour.
8 Nov 2017

What does ADHD look like in the classroom? ›

A child who can't seem to sit still, who blurts out answers in class without raising his hand, who doesn't finish his homework, who seems to be daydreaming when the teacher gives instructions—these are well-known symptoms of ADHD.

Which curriculum is best for ADHD? ›

  • Finding your child's learning style is one of the keys to success in any homeschool. ...
  • Singapore Math.
  • Easy Grammar.
  • WriteShop Junior E.
  • Verbal Math.
  • Usborne History Books.
  • Young Scientist's Club.
  • Anything from Critical Thinking Company.

Is homeschooling better for ADHD? ›

Homeschooling offers great benefits and flexibility that are perfect for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Providing your child with ADHD an education that can be catered to their needs helps them gain confidence and perform better academically.

What are the 4 accommodation categories? ›

Accommodations are typically grouped into four categories: presentation, response, setting, and timing and scheduling.

What are classroom accommodations? ›

The term "accommodation" may be used to describe an alteration of environment, curriculum format, or equipment that allows an individual with a disability to gain access to content and/or complete assigned tasks. They allow students with disabilities to pursue a regular course of study.

What are the most common accommodations for students with learning disabilities? ›

Examination Accommodations
  • extended exam time, typically time and one half to double time.
  • to take exams in a room with reduced distractions.
  • the assistance of a reader, scribe, or word processor for exams.
  • the option of an oral exam.
  • to use spelling and grammar assistive devices for essay exams.

What should be included in IEP for ADHD? ›

Other things an IEP includes are:
  • available services, such as special educational lessons, for example, extra reading classes.
  • timing of services, when they happen, and how long they will last.
  • any changes to the child's learning environment.
  • format of class tests and exams.
  • inclusion in class and other school activities.
12 May 2021

Why do people with ADHD need accommodations? ›

Student accommodations are designed to support students with learning challenges so they can achieve their academic potential. Accommodations help ADHD students both in how they acquire information, for example, in class, and how they demonstrate their knowledge in exam situations.

What assistive technology is used for ADHD? ›

Learning Ally is an assistive technology that is designed for students and other individuals that learn through listening. Students suffering from ADD/ADHD can use this technology to complete their homework or assignments, while adults can use it for work purposes.

What are six strategies teachers could use to teach a child with ADHD and help them be successful? ›

“My ADHD Teaching Strategies That Benefit All Students.”
  • Focus on short-term goals. When teaching children with ADHD, keep in mind that long-term goals are often overwhelming. ...
  • Rewards work. ...
  • Play music. ...
  • Teach students about the brain. ...
  • Allow them time to calm down. ...
  • Include mindfulness activities.

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